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50 DAYS OF COACHELLA ARTISTS: Dr. Dre & Snoop Dogg – #1

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50 DAYS OF COACHELLA ARTISTS: Dr. Dre & Snoop Dogg – #1

Posted on 12 April 2012 by admin

 

 

From Wikipedia.com

Andre Romelle Young (born February 18, recipe 1965), better known by his stage name Dr. Dre, is an American rapperrecord producerrecord executiveentrepreneur, and occasional actor. He is the founder and current CEO of Aftermath Entertainment and a former co-owner and artist of Death Row Records. He has produced albums for and overseen the careers of many rappers, including Snoop DoggEminem and 50 Cent. As a producer he is credited as a key figure in the popularization of West Coast G-funk, a style of rap music characterized as synthesizer-based with slow, heavy beats.

Dre began his career in music as a member of the World Class Wreckin’ Cru and he later found fame with the influential gangsta rap group N.W.A with Eazy-EIce CubeMC Ren, and DJ Yella which popularized the use of explicit lyrics in rap to detail the violence of street life. His 1992 solo debut, The Chronic, released under Death Row Records, led him to become one of the best-selling American performing artists of 1993 and to win a Grammy Award for the single “Let Me Ride“. In 1996, he left Death Row to establish his own label, Aftermath Entertainment. Under that label, he produced a compilation album titled Dr. Dre Presents the Aftermath in 1996, and released a solo album titled 2001 in 1999, for which he won the Grammy producer’s award the next year.

During the 2000s, he focused his career on production for other artists, while occasionally contributing vocals to other artists’ songs. Dr. Dre signed Eminem and 50 Cent to his record label in 1998 and 2003 respectively while contributing production on their albums. Rolling Stone named Dr. Dre among the highest-paid performers of 2001 and 2004. Dr. Dre has also had acting roles in movies such as Set It Off, and the 2001 films The Wash and Training Day.

Early life

André Romelle Young was born in ComptonCalifornia on February 18, 1965. He was the first child of Theodore and Verna Young, ages 17 and 16, respectively at that time.[citation needed] André’s middle name, Romelle, is derived from his father’s amateur R&B singing group, The Romells. Married in 1964, André’s parents divorced in 1968.[citation needed] Verna later married Curtis Crayon. They had three more children together, two sons named Jerome and Tyree (both deceased)[2][3] and daughter Shameka.[4]

In 1976, Young began attending Vanguard Junior High School in Compton, but due to gang violence, he transferred to the safer suburban Roosevelt Junior High School.[5] Verna later married Warren Griffin, whom she met at her new job in Long Beach,[6]which added three stepsisters and one stepbrother to the family. That stepbrother, Warren Griffin III, would eventually become rapper Warren G.[7] Young attended Centennial High School in Compton during his freshman year in 1979, but transferred toFremont High School due to poor grades. Young attempted to enroll in an apprenticeship program at Northrop Aviation Company, but poor grades at school made him ineligible. Thereafter, he focused on his social life and entertainment for the remainder of his high school years.[8] Young fathered a son, Curtis, born December 15, 1981, with Lisa Johnson. Curtis Young was brought up by his mother and first met his father 20 years later, when Curtis became rapper Hood Surgeon.[9]

Music career

1984–85: World Class Wreckin’ Cru

Dr. Dre (in red) during his time in World Class Wreckin’ Cru

Inspired by the Grandmaster Flash song “The Adventures of Grandmaster Flash on the Wheels of Steel“, he often attended a club called The Eve After Dark to watch many DJs and rappers performing live. He subsequently became a DJ in the club, initially under the name “Dr. J”, based on the nickname of Julius Erving, his favorite basketball player. At the club, he met aspiring rapper Antoine Carraby, later to become member DJ Yella of N.W.A.[10] Soon afterwards he adopted the moniker Dr. Dre, a mix of previous alias Dr. J and his first name, referring to himself as the “Master of Mixology”.[11] He later joined the musical groupWorld Class Wreckin’ Cru under the independent Kru-Cut Records in 1984. The group would become stars of the electro-hop scene that dominated early 1980s West Coast hip hop, and their first hit “Surgery” would prominently feature Dr. Dre on the turntables and sell 50,000 copies within the Compton area.[12] Dr. Dre and DJ Yella also performed mixes for local radio station KDAY, boosting ratings for its afternoon rush-hour show The Traffic Jam.[13] Dr. Dre’s earliest recordings were released in 1994 on a compilation titled Concrete Roots. Stephen Thomas Erlewine of the website Allmusic described the compiled music, released “several years before Dre developed a distinctive style”, as “surprisingly generic and unengaging” and “for dedicated fans only”.[14]

His frequent absences from school jeopardized his position as a diver on his school’s swim team. After high school, he attended Chester Adult School in Compton following his mother’s demands for him to get a job or continue his education. After brief attendance at a radio broadcasting school, he relocated to the residence of his father and residence of his grandparents before returning to his mother’s house.[15] He later dropped out of Chester to focus on performing at the Eve’s After Dark nightclub.

1986–91: N.W.A and Ruthless Records


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In 1986, Dr. Dre met rapper Ice Cube, who collaborated with Dr. Dre to record songs for Ruthless Records, a rap record label run by local rapper Eazy-EN.W.Aand fellow West Coast rapper Ice-T are widely credited as seminal artists of the gangsta rap genre, a profanity-heavy subgenre of hip hop, replete with gritty depictions of urban crime and gang lifestyle. Not feeling constricted to racially charged political issues pioneered by rap artists such as Public Enemy or Boogie Down Productions, N.W.A favored themes and uncompromising lyrics, offering stark descriptions of violent, inner-city streets. Propelled by the hit “Fuck tha Police“, the group’s first full album Straight Outta Compton became a major success, despite an almost complete absence of radio airplay or major concert tours. The Federal Bureau of Investigationsent Ruthless Records a warning letter in response to the song’s content.[16]

After Ice Cube left N.W.A in 1989 over financial disputes, Dr. Dre produced and performed for much of the group’s second album Efil4zaggin. He also produced tracks for a number of other rap acts on Ruthless Records, including Above the Law, and The D.O.C. for his 1989 album No One Can Do It Better.[17] In 1991, at a music industry party in Hollywood, he assaulted television host Dee Barnes of the Fox television program Pump it Up, feeling dissatisfied with a news report of hers regarding the feud between the remaining N.W.A members and Ice Cube. Thus, Dr. Dre was fined $2,500 and given two years’ probation and 240 hours of community service, as well as a spot on an anti-violence public service announcement on television.[18][19]

1992–95: The Chronic and Death Row Records


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After a dispute with Eazy-E, Dre left the group at the peak of its popularity in 1991 under the advice of friend, and N.W.A lyricist, The D.O.C. and his bodyguard at the time, Suge Knight. Knight, a notorious strongman and intimidator, was able to have Eazy-E release Young from his contract and, using Dr. Dre as his flagship artist, founded Death Row Records. In 1992 Young released his first single, the title track to the film Deep Cover, a collaboration with rapper Snoop Dogg, whom he met through Warren G.[16] Dr. Dre’s debut solo album was The Chronic, released under Death Row Records. Young ushered in a new style of rap, both in terms of musical style and lyrical content.[20]

On the strength of singles such as “Nuthin’ but a ‘G’ Thang“, “Let Me Ride“, and “Fuck wit Dre Day (and Everybody’s Celebratin’)” (known as “Dre Day” for radio and television play), all of which featured Snoop Dogg as guest vocalist, The Chronic became a cultural phenomenon, its G-funk sound dominating much of hip hop music for the early 1990s.[16] In 1993 the Recording Industry Association of America certified the album multi-platinum,[21] and Dr. Dre also won the Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance for his performance on “Let Me Ride“.[22] For that year, Billboard magazine also ranked Dr. Dre as the eighth best-selling musical artist, The Chronic as the sixth best-selling album, and “Nuthin’ but a ‘G’ Thang” as the 11th best-selling single.[23]

Besides working on his own material, Dr. Dre produced Snoop Dogg’s debut album Doggystyle, which became the first debut album for an artist to debut at number one on the Billboard 200 album charts.[24] In 1994 Dr. Dre produced some songs on the soundtracks to the films Above the Rim and Murder Was the Case. He collaborated with fellow N.W.A member Ice Cube for the song “Natural Born Killaz” in 1995.[16] For the film Friday, Dre recorded “Keep Their Heads Ringin’“, which reached No.10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No.1 on the Hot Rap Singles (now Hot Rap Tracks) charts.[25]

In 1995, just as Death Row Records was signing rapper 2Pac and positioning him as their major star, Young left the label amidst a contract dispute and growing concerns that label boss Suge Knight was corrupt, financially dishonest and out of control. In 1996, he formed his own label, Aftermath Entertainment, under the distribution label for Death Row Records, Interscope Records.[16] Subsequently, Death Row Records suffered poor sales by 1997, especially following the death of 2Pac and theracketeering charges brought against Knight.[26]

1996–98: Move to Aftermath Entertainment

The Dr. Dre Presents the Aftermath album, released on November 26, 1996, featured songs by Dr. Dre himself, as well as by newly signed Aftermath Entertainment artists, and a solo track “Been There, Done That“, intended as a symbolic farewell togangsta rap.[27] Despite being classified platinum by the RIAA,[28] the album was not very popular among music fans.[16] In October 1996, Dre performed “Been There, Done That” on Saturday Night Live.[29] In 1997, Dr. Dre produced several tracks on The Firm‘s The Album; it was met with largely negative reviews from critics. Rumors began to abound that Aftermath was facing financial difficulties.[30] Aftermath Entertainment also faced a trademark infringement lawsuit by the underground thrash metal band Aftermath.[31] First Round Knock Out, a compilation of various tracks produced and performed by Dr. Dre was also released in 1996, with material ranging from World Class Wreckin’ Cru to N.W.A to Death Row recordings.[32]

Despite the mixed reception to his label’s album, Dr. Dre was featured on two Billboard Hot 100 No.1 singles in 1996, those being 2Pac‘s “California Love” and R&B group Blackstreet‘s “No Diggity“. They were Dr. Dre’s first No.1 singles as a lead or featured artist.

The turning point for Aftermath came in 1998, when Jimmy Iovine, the head of Aftermath’s parent label Interscope, suggested that Dr. Dre sign Eminem, a rapper from Detroit. Dre produced three songs and provided vocals for two on Eminem’s successful and controversial debut album The Slim Shady LP, released in 1999.[33] The Dr. Dre-produced lead single from that album, “My Name Is“, would help propel Eminem into stardom. The album was eventually certified 4x Platinum and helped to revive the Aftermath label. Also during this time, Dre assisted on the mix for Nine Inch Nails‘ track “Even Deeper”, from 1999 album The Fragile.

1999–2000: 2001

from 2001

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Dr. Dre’s second solo album, 2001, released on November 16, 1999, was considered an ostentatious return to his gangsta rap roots.[34] It was initially titled The Chronic 2000 to imply being a sequel to his debut solo effort The Chronic but was re-titled 2001 after Death Row Records released an unrelated compilation album with the title Chronic 2000: Still Smokin in May 1999. Other tentative titles included The Chronic 2001 and Dr. Dre.[35] The album featured numerous collaborators, including Devin the Dude, Hittman, Snoop Dogg, XzibitNate Dogg and Eminem. Stephen Thomas Erlewine of the website Allmusic described the sound of the album as “adding ominous strings, soulful vocals, and reggae” to Dr. Dre’s style.[34] The album was highly successful, charting at number two on theBillboard 200 charts[36] and has since been certified six times platinum,[21] validating a recurring theme on the album: Dr. Dre was still a force to be reckoned with, despite the lack of major releases in the previous few years. The album included popular hit singles “Still D.R.E.” and “Forgot About Dre“, both of which Dr. Dre performed on NBC’s Saturday Night Live on October 23, 1999.[37] Dr. Dre won the Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical in 2000,[16] and joined the Up in Smoke Tour with fellow rappers Eminem, Snoop Dogg, and Ice Cube that year as well.[38]

During the course of 2001′s popularity, Dr. Dre was involved in several lawsuits. Lucasfilm Ltd., the film company behind the Star Wars film franchise, sued him over the use of the THX-trademarked “Deep Note“.[39] The Fatback Band also sued Dr. Dre over alleged infringement regarding its song “Backstrokin'” in his song “Let’s Get High” from the 2001 album; Dr. Dre was ordered to pay $1.5 million to the band in 2003.[40] The online music file-sharing company Napster also settled a lawsuit with him and heavy metal rock band Metallica in the summer of 2001, agreeing to block access to certain files that artists do not want to have shared on the network.[41]

2001–08: Focus on production

Following the success of 2001, Dr. Dre focused on producing songs and albums for other artists. He co-produced six tracks on Eminem’s landmark Marshall Mathers LP, including the Grammy-winning lead single, “The Real Slim Shady”. The album itself earned a Grammy and proved to be the fastest-selling rap album of all time, moving 1.76 million units in its first week alone.[42] He produced the single “Family Affair” by R&B singer Mary J. Blige for her album No More Drama in 2001.[43] He also produced “Let Me Blow Ya Mind“, a duet by rapper Eve and No Doubt lead singer Gwen Stefani[44] and signed R&B singer Truth Hurts to Aftermath in 2001.[45] Dr. Dre was the executive producer of Eminem’s 2002 release, The Eminem Show. He produced three songs on the album, one of which was released as a single, and he appeared in the award-winning video for “Without Me”.

Another copyright-related lawsuit hit Dr. Dre in the fall of 2002, when Sa Re Ga Ma, a film and music company based in Calcutta, India, sued Aftermath Entertainment over an uncredited sample of the Lata Mangeshkar song “Thoda Resham Lagta Hai” on the Aftermath-produced song “Addictive” by singer Truth Hurts. In February 2003, a judge ruled that Aftermath would have to halt sales of Truth Hurts’ album Truthfully Speaking if the company would not credit Mangeshkar.[46]

Another successful album on the Aftermath label was Get Rich or Die Tryin’, the 2003 major-label debut album by Queens, New York-based rapper 50 Cent. Dr. Dre produced or co-produced four tracks on the album, including the hit single “In da Club“, a joint production between Aftermath, Eminem’s boutique label Shady Records and Interscope.[47] Eminem’s fourth album since joining Aftermath, Encore, again saw Dre taking on the role of executive producer, and this time he was more actively involved in the music, producing or co-producing a total of eight tracks, including three singles. In November 2004, at the Vibe magazine awards show in Los Angeles, Dr. Dre was attacked by a fan named Jimmy James Johnson, who was supposedly asking for an autograph. In the resulting scuffle, then-G-Unit rapper Young Buck stabbed the man.[48] Johnson claimed that Suge Knight, president of Death Row Records, paid him $5,000 to assault Dre in order to humiliate him before he received his Lifetime Achievement Award.[49] Knight immediately went on CBS‘s The Late Late Show to deny involvement and insisted that he supported Dr. Dre and wanted Johnson charged.[50] In September 2005, Johnson was sentenced to a year in prison and ordered to stay away from Dr. Dre until 2008.[51]

Dr. Dre also produced “How We Do“, a 2005 hit single from rapper The Game from his album The Documentary.[52] For an issue of Rolling Stone magazine in April 2005, Dr. Dre was ranked 54th out of 100 artists for Rolling Stone magazine’s list “The Immortals: The Greatest Artists of All Time”. Kanye West wrote the summary for Dr. Dre, where he stated Dr. Dre’s song “Xplosive” as where he “got (his) whole sound from”.[53]

In November 2006, Dr. Dre began working with Raekwon on his album Only Built 4 Cuban Linx II.[54] He also produced tracks for the rap albums Buck the World by Young Buck,[55] Curtis by 50 Cent,[56] Tha Blue Carpet Treatment by Snoop Dogg,[57] andKingdom Come by Jay-Z.[58] Dre also appeared on Timbaland‘s track “Bounce”, from his 2007 solo album, Timbaland Presents Shock Value along side, Missy Elliott, and Justin Timberlake.[59]

Planned but unreleased albums during Dr. Dre’s tenure at Aftermath have included a full-length reunion with Snoop Dogg titled Breakup to Makeup, an album with fellow former N.W.A member Ice Cube which was to be titled Heltah Skeltah,[17] an N.W.A reunion album,[17] and a joint album with fellow producer Timbaland titled Chairmen of the Board.[60] Other upcoming albums for which he will produce include The Reformation by Bishop Lamont,[61] The Nacirema Dream by Papoose,[62] Flirt by Eve,[63]and an upcoming album by Queen Latifah.[64]

2009–present: Detox and The Planets

Detox is to be Dr. Dre’s final album.[65] In 2002, Dre told Corey Moss of MTV News that he intended Detox to be a concept album.[66] Work for the album dates back to early 2004,[67] but later in that year he decided to stop working on the album to focus on producing for other artists, but then changed his mind; the album had initially been set for a fall 2005 release.[68] After several delays, the album was finally scheduled to be released sometime in 2010 by Interscope Records, which has not set a firm release date for the album as of July 2010.[65] Producers confirmed to work on the album include DJ KhalilNottz, Bernard “Focus” Edwards Jr.,[69] Hi-Tek,[70] J.R. Rotem,[71] RZA,[72] Jay-Z,[73] Warren G, and Boi-1da.[74] Snoop Dogg claimed that Detoxwas finished, according to a June 2008 report by Rolling Stone magazine.[75]

After another delay based on producing other artists’ work, Detox was then scheduled for a 2010 release, coming after 50 Cent’s Before I Self Destruct and Eminem’s Relapse, an album for which Dr. Dre handled the bulk of production duties.[76][77] Dre appeared in the remix of the song “Set It Off” by Canadian rapper Kardinal Offishall (also with Pusha T); the remix debuted on DJ Skee‘s radio show in December 2008.[78] At the beginning of 2009, Dre produced, and made a guest vocal performance on, the single “Crack a Bottle” by Eminem and the single sold a record 418,000 downloads in its first week.[79] and reached the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart on the week of February 12, 2009.[80] Along with this single, in 2009 Dr. Dre produced or co-produced 19 of 20 tracks on Eminem’s album Relapse. These included other hit singles “We Made You“, “Old Time’s Sake“, and “3 a.m.“. (the only track Dre didn’t produce was the Eminem produced single “Beautiful“)

In a Dr Pepper commercial that debuted on May 28, 2009, he premiered the first official snippet of Detox.[81][82] 50 Cent and Eminem asserted in an interview on BET‘s 106 & Park that Dr. Dre had around a dozen songs finished for Detox.[83] Detox is likely to be released sometime in 2012.[84] The first two singles, “Kush” and “I Need a Doctor“, were released in September 2010 and February 2011 respectively. “Kush” has become a top 40 hit in the United States and “I Need a Doctor” peaked at Number Four on the Billboard Hot 100.[85] The third single, “The Psycho” featuring 50 Cent is set to release sometime this year respectively.

The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers will honor Dr. Dre with its Founders Award for inspiring other musicians.[86]

In an August 2010 interview, Dr. Dre stated that an instrumental album titled The Planets is in its first stages of production; each song being named after a planet in the Solar System.[87] On September 3, Dr. Dre showed support to longtime protégéEminem, and appeared on his and Jay-Z‘s Home & Home Tour, performing hit songs such as “Still D.R.E.,” “Nuthin’ but a ‘G’ Thang,” and “Crack a Bottle,” alongside Eminem and another protégé, 50 Cent. Sporting an “R.I.P. Proof” shirt, Dre was honored by Eminem telling Detroit’s Comerica Park to do the same. They did so, by chanting “DEEE-TOX,” to which he replied, “I’m coming!”[88]

Dr. Dre was featured on the cover of XXL in the December/January 2011 issue. After Detox he will be one of the producers of Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins‘ album Still Cool.[89]

On November 14, 2011, Dre announced that he will be taking a break from music once he has finished producing for artists Slim the Mobster and Kendrick Lamar. In this break he will work on bringing his Beats By Dre to a standard as high as Apple and will also spend time with his family.[90]

On January 9th, 2012 Dre was announced to headline the final nights of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival taking place the weekends of April 13-15 and April 20-22. [91]

Other ventures

Film career

Dr. Dre made his first on screen appearance as a weapons dealer in the 1996 bank robbery movie Set It Off.[92] In 2001, Dr. Dre also appeared in the movies The Wash and Training Day.[93] A song of his, “Bad Intentions” (featuring Knoc-Turn’Al) and produced by Mahogany, was featured on The Wash soundtrack.[94] Dr. Dre also appeared on two other songs “On the Blvd.” and “The Wash” along with his co-star Snoop Dogg. In February 2007 it was announced that Dr. Dre would produce dark comedies and horror films for New Line Cinema-owned company Crucial Films, along with longtime video director Phillip Atwell. Dr. Dre announced “This is a natural switch for me, since I’ve directed a lot of music videos, and I eventually want to get into directing.”[95] Along with fellow member Ice Cube, Dr. Dre will produce a biographical film about N.W.A tentatively titled Straight Outta Compton.[96]

Entrepreneurship

Beats By Dr. Dre logo

In July 2008, Dr. Dre released his brand of headphones, Beats by Dr. Dre. The line consists of Beats Studio, a circumaural headphone, Beats Tour, an in-ear headphone, Beats Solo & Solo HD, a supra-auralheadphone, Beats Spin, Heartbeats by Lady Gaga, also an in-ear headphone, and Diddy Beats.[97] The headphones are made by Monster.[98] He is also planning to release an “Aftermath Cognac and vodka” at around the same time he releases Detox.[99] For the 2009 Fall season, HP and Dr. Dre are teaming up to release Beats By Dr. Dre with the sale of all HP laptops and headsets.[100] HP and Dr. Dre announced the deal on October 9, 2009, at a press event in Santa Monica, California. The new laptop, known as HP ENVY 15 Beats limited edition, will be available for sale October 22 and be priced around $2,299. Besides the laptop, the PC comes with Dr. Dre’s signature headphones.[101]

Musical influences and style

Dr. Dre has said that his primary instrument in the studio is the Akai MPC3000, a drum machine and sampler, and that he often uses as many as four or five to produce a single recording. He cites 1970s funk musicians such as George ClintonIsaac Hayes and Curtis Mayfield as his primary musical influences. Unlike most rap producers, he tries to avoid samples as much as possible, preferring to have studio musicians re-play pieces of music he wants to use, because it allows him more flexibility to change the pieces in rhythm and tempo.[102] In 2001 he told Time magazine, “I may hear something I like on an old record that may inspire me, but I’d rather use musicians to re-create the sound or elaborate on it. I can control it better.”[103] Other equipment he uses include the E-mu SP-1200 drum machine and other keyboards from such manufacturers as Korg, Rhodes, Wurlitzer, Moog, and Roland.[104]

After founding Aftermath Entertainment in 1996, Dr. Dre took on producer Mel-Man as a co-producer, and his music took on a more synthesizer-based sound, using fewer vocal samples (as he had used on “Lil’ Ghetto Boy” and “Let Me Ride” on The Chronic, for example). Mel-Man has not shared co-production credits with Dr. Dre since approximately 2002, but fellow Aftermath producer Focus has credited Mel-Man as a key architect of the signature Aftermath sound.[105]

In 1999, Dr. Dre started working with Mike Elizondo, a bassist, guitarist, and keyboardist who has also produced, written and played on records for female singers such as PoeFiona Apple and Alanis Morissette,[106] In the past few years Elizondo has since worked for many of Dr. Dre’s productions.[107][108] Dr. Dre also told Scratch magazine in a 2004 interview that he has been studying piano and music theory formally, and that a major goal is to accumulate enough musical theory to score movies. In the same interview he stated that he has collaborated with famed 1960s songwriter Burt Bacharach by sending him hip hop beats to play over, and hopes to have an in-person collaboration with him in the future.[102]

Work ethic

Dr. Dre has stated that he is a perfectionist and is known to pressure the artists with whom he records to give flawless performances.[102] In 2006 Snoop Dogg told the website Dubcnn.com that Dr. Dre had made new artist Bishop Lamont re-record a single bar of vocals 107 times.[109] Dr. Dre has also stated that Eminem is a fellow perfectionist, and attributes his success on Aftermath to his similar work ethic.[102] He gives a lot of input into the delivery of the vocals and will stop an MC during a take if it isn’t to his liking.[110] However, he does give MCs he works with room to write lyrics without too much instruction unless it is a specifically conceptual record, as noted by Bishop Lamont in the book How to Rap.[111]

A consequence of his perfectionism is that some artists that initially sign deals with Dr. Dre’s Aftermath label never release albums. In 2001, Aftermath released the soundtrack to the movie The Wash, featuring a number of Aftermath acts such as Shaunta, Daks, Joe Beast and Toi. To date, none have released full-length albums on Aftermath and have apparently ended their relationships with the label and Dr. Dre. Other noteworthy acts to leave Aftermath without releasing albums include King Tee,2001 vocalist Hittman, Joell OrtizRaekwon and Rakim.[112]

Collaborators/co-producers

Over the years word of other collaborators has surfaced. During his tenure at Death Row Records, it was alleged that Dr. Dre’s stepbrother Warren G and Tha Dogg Pound member Daz made many uncredited contributions to songs on his solo album The Chronic and Snoop Doggy Dogg’s album Doggystyle (Daz received production credits on Snoop’s similar-sounding, albeit less successful album Tha Doggfather after Young left Death Row Records).[113]

It is known that Scott Storch, who has since gone on to become a successful producer in his own right, contributed to Dr. Dre’s second album 2001; Storch is credited as a songwriter on several songs and played keyboards on several tracks. In 2006 he told Rolling Stone:

“At the time, I saw Dr. Dre desperately needed something,” Storch says. “He needed a fuel injection, and Dr. Dre utilized me as the nitrous oxide. He threw me into the mix, and I sort of tapped on a new flavor with my whole piano sound and the strings and orchestration. So I’d be on the keyboards, and Mike [Elizondo] was on the bass guitar, and Dr. Dre was on the drum machine”.[114]

Current collaborator Mike Elizondo, when speaking about his work with Young, describes their recording process as a collaborative effort involving several musicians. In 2004 he claimed to Songwriter Universe magazine that he had written the foundations of the hit Eminem song “The Real Slim Shady“, stating, “I initially played a bass line on the song, and Dr. Dre, Tommy Coster Jr. and I built the track from there. Eminem then heard the track, and he wrote the rap to it.”[108] This account is essentially confirmed by Eminem in his book Angry Blonde, stating that the tune for the song was composed by a studio bassist and keyboardist while Dr. Dre was out of the studio but Young later programmed the song’s beat after returning.[115]

A group of disgruntled former associates of Dr. Dre complained that they had not received their full due for work on the label in the September 2003 issue of The Source. A producer named Neff-U claimed to have produced the songs “Say What You Say” and “My Dad’s Gone Crazy” on The Eminem Show, the songs “If I Can’t” and “Back Down” on 50 Cent’s Get Rich or Die Tryin’, and the beat featured on Dr. Dre’s commercial for Coors beer.[112]

Although Young studies piano and musical theory, he serves as more of a conductor than a musician himself, as Josh Tyrangiel of TIME magazine has noted:

Every Dre track begins the same way, with Dre behind a drum machine in a room full of trusted musicians. (They carry beepers. When he wants to work, they work.) He’ll program a beat, then ask the musicians to play along; when Dre hears something he likes, he isolates the player and tells him how to refine the sound. “My greatest talent,” Dre says, “is knowing exactly what I want to hear.”[103]

Although Snoop Dogg retains working relationships with Warren G and Daz, who are alleged to be uncredited contributors on the hit albums The Chronic and Doggystyle, he states that Dr. Dre is capable of making beats without the help of collaborators, and that he is responsible for the success of his numerous albums.[116] Dr. Dre’s prominent studio collaborators, including Scott Storch, Elizondo, Mark Batson and Dawaun Parker, have shared co-writing, instrumental, and more recently co-production credits on the songs where he is credited as the producer.

Ghostwriters

It is acknowledged that most of Dr. Dre’s raps are written for him by others, though he retains ultimate control over his lyrics and the themes of his songs.[117] As Aftermath producer Mahogany told Scratch: “It’s like a class room in [the booth]. He’ll have three writers in there. They’ll bring in something, he’ll recite it, then he’ll say. ‘Change this line, change this word,’ like he’s grading papers.”[118] As seen in the credits for tracks Young has appeared on, there are often multiple people who contribute to his songs (although often in hip hop many people are officially credited as a writer for a song, even the producer).

In the book How to RapRBX explains that writing The Chronic was a “team effort”[117] and details how he ghostwrote “Let Me Ride” for Dre.[117] In regard to ghostwriting lyrics he says, “Dre doesn’t profess to be no super-duper rap dude – Dre is a super-duper producer”.[117] As a member of N.W.A, The D.O.C. wrote lyrics for him while he stuck with producing.[17] New York City rapper Jay-Z ghostwrote lyrics for the single “Still D.R.E.” from Dr. Dre’s album 2001.[35]

Personal life

Relationships and family

Dr. Dre’s eldest son is named Curtis Young. When Curtis Young was born, Greene was 16, and Dr. Dre was 17. Curtis Young is an aspiring rapper who goes by the rap moniker “Hood Surgeon”.[119] In 1988, Dr. Dre had his second son, Andre Young Jr., with Jenita Porter. Porter sued Dr. Dre in 1990 in Orange County Superior Court seeking $5,000 of child support per month.[120] From 1990 to 1996, Dr. Dre dated singer Michel’le, who frequently contributed vocals to Death Row Records albums. In 1991, the couple had a son, Marcel.[121] In 1996, Dr. Dre married Nicole Threatt, the ex-wife of NBA player Sedale Threatt.[122] They have two children together: a son named Truth (born 1997) and a daughter named Truly (born 2001).[123]

On August 23, 2008, Young’s second son, Andre Young Jr., died at the age of 20 at his mother’s Woodland Hills home.[120] The coroner determined that he died from an overdose of heroin and morphine.[124]

Income

In 2001, Dr. Dre earned a total of about US$52 million from selling part of his share of Aftermath Entertainment to Interscope Records and his production of such hit songs that year as “Family Affair” by Mary J. BligeRolling Stone magazine thus named him the second highest-paid artist of the year.[43] Dr. Dre was ranked 44th in 2004 from earnings of $11.4 million, primarily from production royalties from such projects as albums from G-Unit and D12 and the single “Rich Girl” by singer Gwen Stefani and rapper Eve.[125]

 

From Wikipedia.com

Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. (born October 20, 1971), better known by his stage name Snoop Dogg (formerly known as Snoop Doggy Dogg), is an American rappersingerrecord producer, and actor. Snoop is best known as a rapper in the West Coast hip hop scene, and for being one of Dr. Dre‘s most notable protégés. Snoop Dogg was a Crip gang member while in high school. Shortly after graduation, he was arrested for cocaine possession and spent six months in Wayside County Jail. His music career began in 1992 after his release when he was discovered by Dr. Dre. He collaborated on several tracks on Dre’s solo debut, The Chronic and on the titular theme song to the film Deep Cover.

Snoop’s debut album Doggystyle, was released in 1993 under Death Row Records making a debut at No.1 on both the Billboard 200 and R&B charts. Selling almost a million copies in the first week of its release, Doggystyle quickly became certified 4x platinum in 1994 and spawned several hit singles, including “What’s My Name” and “Gin & Juice“. In 1994, Snoop released a soundtrack on Death Row Records for the short film Murder Was The Case, starring himself. In early 1996, Snoop Dogg was cleared of charges over his bodyguard’s 1993 murder of Philip Woldemariam. His second album, late 1996’s Tha Doggfather, also debuted at No.1 on both charts with “Snoop’s Upside Ya Head” as the lead single. The album sold only half as well, being certified double platinum in 1997.

Tha Doggfather was his last release for Death Row before he signed with No Limit Records, where he recorded his next three albums. Da Game Is to Be Sold, Not to Be Told in 1998, No Limit Top Dogg in 1999 (making it his last album of the 90s), and Tha Last Meal in 2000, which was his last No Limit Records album. Snoop then signed with Priority/Capitol/EMI Records in 2002, where he released his album Paid tha Cost to Be da Boss. Then he signed with Geffen Records in 2004 for his next three albums R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): The MasterpieceTha Blue Carpet Treatment, and Ego Trippin’Malice ‘n Wonderland(2009) and Doggumentary (2011), his most recent release, were on Priority.

In addition to music, Snoop Dogg has starred in motion pictures and hosted several television shows: Doggy Fizzle TelevizzleSnoop Dogg’s Father Hood and Dogg After Dark. He also coaches a youth football league and high school football team. He has run into many legal troubles, some of which caused him to be legally banned from the UK and Australia, although the UK ban was later reversed after a long legal battle.[1] He is the cousin of Nate DoggDaz DillingerRBX and Lil’ ½ Dead and the cousin of R&B singers Brandy and Ray J. Starting September 2009, Snoop was hired by EMI as the chairman of a reactivatedPriority Records.[2]

 

Life and career

Early life

Named after his stepfather, Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Sr. (December 10, 1948 – November 9, 1985, Los Angeles), Calvin Broadus was born October 20, 1971 at the Los Altos Hospital in Long Beach, California, the second of three sons of Beverly Broadus (née Tate; born April 27, 1951, McComb, Mississippi).[3][4][5] His father, Vernall Varnado (born December 13, 1949, Magnolia, Mississippi),[3] was a Vietnam veteran, singer, and mail carrier who was said to be frequently absent from his life.[6] Broadus’ parents nicknamed him “Snoopy” as a child because of his appearance, but usually addressed him as Calvin at home.[7][8] His mother and stepfather divorced in 1975. At an early age, Broadus began singing in Golgotha Trinity Baptist Church and playing piano; when he was in sixth grade, he began rapping.[9][10] He attended Long Beach Polytechnic High School, and was convicted for cocaine possession, serving six months at the Wayside County Jail.[7]

As a teenager, Snoop Dogg frequently ran into trouble with the law. Snoop Dogg was a member of the Rollin’ 20 Crips gang in the Eastside of Long Beach,[11][12] although he stated in 1993 that he never joined a gang.[9] Shortly after graduating from high school, he was arrested for possession of cocaine.[7] Snoop Dogg’s conviction caused him to be frequently in and out of prison for the first three years after he graduated from high school. Snoop, along with his cousins Nate Dogg and Lil’ ½ Dead and friendWarren G, recorded home made tapes as a group called 213, named after the Long Beach area code at the time. One of his early solo freestyles over En Vogue‘s “Hold On” had made it to a mixtape which was heard by influential producer Dr. Dre, who phoned to invite him to an audition. Former N.W.A member The D.O.C. taught him how to structure his lyrics and separate the thematics into verses, hooks and chorus.[13]

1992–93: Doggystyle

When he began recording, Broadus took the stage name Snoop Doggy Dogg. Dr. Dre began working with Snoop Dogg, first on the theme song of the 1992 film Deep Cover, and then on Dr. Dre’s debut solo album The Chronic with the other members of his former starting group, Tha Dogg Pound. The huge success of Snoop Dogg’s debut Doggystyle was partially because of this intense exposure.[7]

To fuel the ascendance of West Coast G-funk hip hop, the singles “Who Am I (What’s My Name)?” and “Gin and Juice” reached the top ten most-played songs in the United States, and the album stayed on the Billboard charts for several months.[7]Gangsta rap became the center of arguments for censorship and labeling, with Snoop Dogg often used as an example of violent and misogynistic musicians.[14] Doggystyle, much like The Chronic, featured a host of rappers signed to or affiliated with the Death Row label including Daz DillingerKuruptNate Dogg and others. Rolling Stone music critic Touré asserted that Snoop had a relatively soft vocal delivery compared to other rappers: “Snoop’s vocal style is part of what distinguishes him: where many rappers scream, figuratively and literally, he speaks softly.”[9]

A short film about Snoop Dogg’s murder trial called Murder Was The Case, was released in 1994, along with an accompanying soundtrack. On July 6, 1995, Doggy Style Records, Inc., a record label founded by Snoop Dogg, was registered with theCalifornia Secretary of State as business entity number C1923139.[15]

1996–97: Tha Doggfather

After Snoop Dogg was acquitted of murder charges on February 20, 1996, he and the mother of his son and their kennel of 20 pit bulls moved into a 5,000-square-foot (460 m2) home in the hills of Claremont, California and by August 1996 Doggy Style Records, a subsidiary of Death Row Records, signed The Gap Band‘s Charlie Wilson as one of the record label’s first artists.[16]

However, by the time Snoop Dogg’s second album, Tha Doggfather, was released in November 1996, the price of living (or sometimes just imitating) the gangsta life had become very evident. Among the many notable hip hop industry deaths and convictions were the death of Snoop Dogg’s friend and labelmate 2Pac and the racketeering indictment of Death Row co-founder Suge Knight.[7] Dr. Dre had left Death Row earlier in 1996 because of a contract dispute, so Snoop Dogg co-produced Tha Doggfather with Daz Dillinger and DJ Pooh.

This album featured a distinct change of style as compared to Doggystyle, and the leadoff single, “Snoop’s Upside Ya Head“, featured a collaboration with Gap Band frontman Charlie Wilson. While the album sold reasonably well, it was not as successful as its predecessor. However, Tha Doggfather had a somewhat softer approach to the G-funk style. The immediate aftermath of Dr. Dre’s withdrawal from Death Row Records, realizing that he was subject to an iron-clad time-based contract (i.e., that Death Row practically owned anything he produced for a number of years), Snoop Dogg refused to produce any more tracks for Suge Knight, other than the insulting “Fuck Death Row”, until his contract expired.[11] In an interview with Neil Strauss in 1998, Snoop Dogg stated that though he had been given lavish gifts by his former label they had withheld royalty payments to the artist.[17]

Stephen Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic said that after Tha Doggfather, Snoop Dogg began “moving away from his gangsta roots toward a calmer lyrical aesthetic”:[7] for instance, Snoop participated in the 1997 Lollapalooza concert tour, which featured mainly alternative rock music. Troy J. Augusto of Variety noticed that Snoop’s set at Lollapalooza attracted “much dancing, and, strangely, even a small mosh pit” in the audience.[18]

1998–2000: No LimitTop Dogg and Tha Last Meal

Snoop signed with Master P‘s No Limit Records (distributed by Priority/EMI Records) in 1998 and debuted on the label with Da Game Is to Be Sold, Not to Be Told that year. His other albums from No Limit were No Limit Top Dogg in 1999 (selling over 1,503,865 copies) and Tha Last Meal in 2000 (selling over 1,000,000).[7] In 2001, his autobiography, Tha Doggfather, was published.

2002: Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$

In 2002 he released the album Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$, on Priority/Capitol/EMI Records, selling over 1,300,000 copies. The album featured the hit singles “From tha Chuuuch to da Palace” and “Beautiful“, featuring guest vocals by Pharrell. By this stage in his career, Snoop Dogg had left behind his “gangster” image and embraced a “pimp” image.

2004–05: R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): The Masterpiece

In 2004, Snoop signed to Geffen Records/Star Trak Entertainment both of which are distributed through Interscope Records; Star Trak is headed by producer duo The Neptunes, which produced several tracks for Snoop’s 2004 release R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): The Masterpiece. “Drop It Like It’s Hot” (featuring Pharrell), the first single released from the album, was a hit and became Snoop Dogg’s first single to reach number one. His third release was “Signs“, featuring Justin Timberlake and Charlie Wilson, which entered the UK chart at #2. This was his highest entry ever in the UK chart. The album sold 1,724,000 copies in the U.S. alone, and most of its singles were heavily played on radio and television. Snoop Dogg joined Warren G and Nate Doggto form the group 213 and released album The Hard Way in 2004. Debuting at No.4 on the Billboard 200 and No.1 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, it included single “Groupie Luv”. Together with fellow rappers Lil’ JonXzibit and David Banner, Snoop Dogg appeared in the music video for Korn‘s “Twisted Transistor“.

2006: Tha Blue Carpet Treatment

Snoop Dogg’s appeared on two tracks from Ice Cube’s 2006 album Laugh Now, Cry Later, including the single “Go to Church“, and on several tracks on Tha Dogg Pound‘s Cali Iz Active the same year. Also, his latest song, “Real Talk”, was leaked over the Internet in the summer of 2006 and a video was later released on the Internet. “Real Talk” was a dedication to former Crips leader Stanley “Tookie” Williams and a diss to Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Governor of California. Two other singles on which Snoop made a guest performance were “Keep Bouncing” by Too $hort (also with will.i.am of The Black Eyed Peas) and “Gangsta Walk” by Coolio.

Snoop’s 2006 album, Tha Blue Carpet Treatment, debuted on the Billboard 200 at No.5 and has sold over 850,000 copies. The album and the second single “That’s That Shit” featuring R. Kelly were well received by critics. In the album, he collaborated in a video with E-40 and other West Coast rappers for his single “Candy (Drippin’ Like Water)“.

2007–08: Ego Trippin’

In July 2007, Snoop Dogg also made history by becoming the first artist to release a track as a ringtone prior to its release as a single, which was “It’s the D.O.G.” On July 7, 2007, Snoop Dogg performed at the Live Earth concert, Hamburg.[19] Snoop Dogg has ventured into singing for Bollywood with his first ever rap for an Indian movie Singh Is Kinng; the title of the song is also “Singh is Kinng”. He also appears in the movie as himself.[20] The album featuring the song was released on June 8, 2008 on Junglee Music Records.[21] He released his ninth studio album, Ego Trippin’ (selling 400,000 copies in the U.S.), along with the first single, “Sexual Eruption“. The single peaked at No.7 on the Billboard 100, featuring Snoop using autotune. The album featured production from QDT (Quik-Dogg-Teddy).

2009–10: Malice n Wonderland and More Malice

Snoop was appointed an executive position at Priority Records. His tenth studio album, Malice n Wonderland, was released on December 8, 2009. The first single from the album, “Gangsta Luv“, featuring The-Dream, peaked at No.35 on the Billboard Hot 100. The album debuted at No.23 on the Billboard 200, selling 61,000 copies its first week, making it his lowest charting album. His third single, “I Wanna Rock“, peaked at No.41 on the Billboard Hot 100. Snoop features on the latest Gorillaz album,Plastic Beach. The fourth single from Malice n Wonderland, titled “Pronto”, featuring Soulja Boy Tell ‘Em, was released on iTunes on December 1, 2009. Snoop re-released the album under the name More Malice.

2011–12: Doggumentary

Snoop collaborated with Katy Perry on the first single from her second mainstream album, “California Gurls“, which was released on May 11, 2010. Snoop can also be heard on the track “Flashing” by Dr. Dre and on Curren$y‘s song “Seat Change“. He was also featured on a new single from Australian singer Jessica Mauboy, titled “Get ’em Girls” (released September 2010). Snoop’s latest effort was backing American recording artist, Emii, on her second single entitled “Mr. Romeo” (released October 26, 2010 as a follow-up to “Magic”). Snoop also collaborated with American comedy troupe The Lonely Island in their song “Turtleneck & Chain”, in their 2011 album Turtleneck & Chain.

Snoop Dogg’s newest studio album is Doggumentary, The album was renamed to Doggumentary and was released during March 2011.[22] Snoop was featured on Gorillaz‘ latest album Plastic Beach on a track called: “Welcome to the World of the Plastic Beach” with the The Hypnotic Brass, he also completed another track with them entitled “Sumthing Like This Night” which does not appear on Plastic Beach, yet does appear on Doggumentary. He also appears on the latest Tech N9ne album All 6’s and 7’s (released June 7, 2011) on a track called “Pornographic” which also features E-40 and Krizz Kaliko.

2012–present: Reincarnated

On February 4, 2012, Snoop Dogg announced a new documentary alongside his new upcoming studio album entitled Reincarnated.[23] Snoop Dogg is set to headline the Osheaga Festival in Montreal, Canada this summer. [24]

Other ventures

Media appearances

Snoop Dogg has appeared on television and in films throughout his career. In 1998, Snoop had a cameo appearance in the film Half Baked as the “Scavenger Smoker”.[25] In 2000, Snoop (as “Michael J. Corleone”) directed Snoop Dogg’s Doggystyle, apornographic film produced by Hustler. The film, combining hip hop with x-rated material, was a huge success and won “Top Selling Release of the Year” at the 2002 AVN Awards.[26] Snoop then directed Snoop Dogg’s Hustlaz: Diary of a Pimp in 2002 (using the nickname “Snoop Scorsese”).[27]

In 2001, Snoop lent his voice to the animated show King of the Hill, in which he played a white pimp named Alabaster Jones.[28] He played a lead character in the movie The Wash with Dr. Dre. He portrayed a drug dealer in a wheelchair in the film Training Day, featuring Denzel Washington.[29] In 2001, Snoop starred in the horror film Bones, with him playing a murdered mobster who returns from the dead to exact his revenge against those who murdered him.

In 2002, Snoop hosted, starred in, and produced his own MTV sketch comedy show entitled Doggy Fizzle Televizzle. Snoop was filmed for a brief cameo appearance in the television movie It’s a Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie (2002), but his performance was omitted from the final cut of the movie.[30] On November 8, 2004, Snoop Dogg was starred in the episode “Two of a Kind” of NBC‘s series Las Vegas.[31]

In 2004, Snoop appeared on the Showtime series The L Word as the character “Slim Daddy”. He also notably played the drug dealer-turned-informant character of Huggy Bear, in the 2004 remake film of the 1970s TV-series of the same name, Starsky & Hutch. He appeared as himself in the episode “MILF Money” of Weeds,[32] and made an appearance on the TV shows Entourage[33] and Monk,[34] for which he recorded a version of the theme, in July 2007.

Snoop Dogg at WrestleMania XXIV at Orlando‘sCitrus Bowl with Ashley Massaro and tag team partner Maria, March 30, 2008

Snoop founded his own production company, Snoopadelic Films, in 2005. Their debut film was Boss’n Up, a film inspired by Snoop Dogg’s album R&G, starring Lil Jon and Trina.[35]

In December 2007, his reality show Snoop Dogg’s Father Hood premiered on the E! channel.[36] Snoop Dogg joined the NBA’s Entertainment League.[37] On March 30, 2008 he appeared at WrestleMania XXIV as a Master of Ceremonies for a tag team match between Maria and Ashley Massaro as they took on Beth Phoenix and Melina.[38]

On May 8 and May 9, 2008, Snoop appeared as himself on the ABC soap opera One Life to Live, with a new opening theme recorded by the artist presented for both episodes. In the episodes, Snoop performs at the bachelorette party for character Adriana Cramer, and credits Bo Buchanan with helping him get his start in show business.[39][40] On February 24, 2010, Snoop Dogg reprised his role, performing his song “I Wanna Rock” from his new album, Malice n Wonderland, as well as once again performing a special remixed, vocal rendition of the show’s opening theme.[41] In recent interviews he has explained that, as a child, One Life to Live was one of his favorite shows, and he still regards the show fondly. He has also stated that he has always been a particular fan of Robert S. Woods, who has portrayed the character of Bo Buchanan since 1979.

In 2009, Snoop Dogg appeared in Sacha Baron Cohen‘s film Brüno as himself performing a rap addition to the song “Dove Of Peace”.[42] On October 19, 2009, Snoop Dogg was the guest host of WWE Raw.

In July 2009, Snoop revealed his desire to appear in the popular soap opera Coronation Street while touring in the UK. However ITV bosses were said to be less keen.[43]

In 2010, Snoop Dogg appeared in an episode of I Get That a Lot on CBS as a parking-lot attendant.

In June 2010, Snoop created a music video for True Blood accompanying a song he wrote for one of the main characters of the show entitled “Oh Sookie.”[44][45]

In March 2011, Snoop participated in Comedy Central‘s Roast of Donald Trump with other comedians and media personalities.[46]

January 2, 2012, appeared on the The Price Is Right and raised $72,000 for his charity, Snoop Youth Football League.

Endorsements

Snoop Dogg performing live in Hawaii, July 23, 2005.

Style and rap skills

Kool Moe Dee ranks Snoop at No.33 in his book There’s a God on the Mic, and says he has “an ultra-smooth, laidback delivery”,[65] and “flavor-filled melodic rhyming”.[66] Peter Shapiro describes Snoop’s delivery as a “molasses drawl[67] and Allmusicnotes his “drawled, laconic rhyming” style.[7] Kool Moe Dee refers to Snoop’s use of vocabulary, saying he “keeps it real simple…he simplifies it and he’s effective in his simplicity”.[68]

Snoop is known to freestyle some of his lyrics on the spot for some songs – in the book How to RapLady of Rage says, “Snoop Dogg, when I worked with him earlier in his career, that’s how created his stuff… he would freestyle, he wasn’t a writer then, he was a freestyler,”[69] and The D.O.C. states, “Snoop’s [rap] was a one take willy, but his shit was all freestyle. He hadn’t written nothing down. He just came in and started busting. The song was “Tha Shiznit”—that was all freestyle. He started busting and when we got to the break, Dre cut the machine off, did the chorus and told Snoop to come back in. He did that throughout the record. That’s when Snoop was in the zone then.”

Peter Shapiro says that Snoop debuted on “Deep Cover” with a “shockingly original flow – which sounded like a Slick Rick born in South Carolina instead of South London[70] and adds that he “showed where his style came from by covering Slick Rick‘s ‘La Di Da Di'”.[67] Referring to Snoop’s flow, Kool Moe Dee calls him “one of the smoothest, funkiest flow-ers in the game”.[66] How to Rap also notes that Snoop is known to use syncopation in his flow to give it a laidback quality,[71] as well as ‘linking with rhythm’ in his compound rhymes,[72] using alliteration,[73] and employing a “sparse” flow with good use of pauses.[74]

Snoop re-popularized the use of -izzle speak, particularly in the pop and hip-hop music industry.[75]

Personal life

Snoop Dogg in August 2009

Broadus’s father left the family when Broadus was three months old. Snoop married his high school sweetheart, Shante Taylor, on June 12, 1997. On May 21, 2004, he filed for divorce from Shante, citing irreconcilable differences.[76] The couple renewed their wedding vows on January 12, 2008.[77] R&B singers Brandy and Ray J are his first cousins.[78] In 2002, the rapper announced he was giving up marijuana, one of his image trademarks, for good.[79] According to his IMDb biography, Snoop is a fan of the thrash metal band Metallica[80] and performed their song “Sad But True” on the band’s 2003 MTV Icon Special which is available on YouTube.[81] A DNA test read by George Lopez on Lopez Tonight revealed Snoop Dogg to be of 0% East Asian, 23% Native American, 6% European, and 71% African descent.[82]

Snoop is an avid fan of hometown teams Los Angeles Dodgers and the Los Angeles Lakers. Snoop is also an avid Pittsburgh Steelers fan.[83] and is often seen wearing Pittsburgh Steelers apparel. Snoop has mentioned that his love for the Steelers began in the 1970s during the team’s dynasty years while watching the team with his grandfather growing up in L.A.[84] In the 2005 offseason, Snoop mentioned that he wanted to be an NFL head coach, “probably for the Steelers”.[85] The following year, he was in attendance for the Steelers’ victory in Super Bowl XL and later in Super Bowl XLIII. He is also a fan of the Oakland Raiders and Dallas Cowboys, often wearing a No.5 jersey, and has been seen at Raiders training camps.[86] He did his own free style rap based on his similarities with Tony Romo.[87][88] He is also a fan of theUSC Trojans Football team. He has also shown affection for the New England Patriots, as he has been seen performing at the Gillette Stadium and picked the Patriots as the favorite to win Super Bowl XXXIX against the Eagles.[89][90] On August 6, 2009, Snoop visited the training camp of the Baltimore Ravens at McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland.[91] He was invited by Ray Lewis the day after his concert at the Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Maryland.

A certified football coach, Snoop Dogg has been head coach for his son’s youth football teams and the John A. Rowland High School team.[92][93]

Snoop Dogg is an avid hockey fan; he sported a Pittsburgh Penguins jersey (with the name and number ‘GIN AND JUICE’ 94 on the back) and a jersey of the now-defunct Springfield (MA) Indians of the American Hockey League in his 1994 music video, “Gin And Juice”. On the E! show, Snoop Dogg’s Father Hood, Snoop Dogg and his family received lessons on playing hockey from the Anaheim Ducks, then returning to the Honda Center to cheer on the Ducks against the Vancouver Canucks in the episode Snow in da Hood.[94]

In 2009, it was revealed that Snoop Dogg was a member of the Nation of Islam. On March 1, 2009, he made an appearance at the Nation of Islam’s annual Saviours’ Day holiday, where he praised minister Louis Farrakhan. Snoop claimed to be a member of the Nation of Islam, but he declined to give the date on which he joined. He also donated $1,000 to the organization.[95][96][97]

Snoop claimed in a 2006 interview with Rolling Stone magazine that unlike other hip hop artists who’ve superficially adopted the pimp persona, he was an actual professional pimp in 2003 and 2004, saying “That shit was my natural calling and once I got involved with it, it became fun. It was like shootin’ layups for me. I was makin’ ’em every time.” He goes on to say that upon the advice of some of the other pimps he knew, he eventually gave up pimping to spend more time with his family.[98]

Legal issues

Mug shot of Snoop Dogg taken in September 1993.

Shortly after graduating from high school, he was arrested for possession of cocaine.[7]

While recording Doggystyle in August 1993, Snoop Dogg was arrested in connection with the death of Phillip Woldermarian, a member of a rival gang who was shot and killed by Snoop’s bodyguard, McKinley Lee; Snoop was charged with murder along with Lee as he was driving the vehicle from which the shooting had commenced. Snoop and Lee were defended by Johnnie Cochran.[99] Both Snoop and Lee were acquitted; Lee was acquitted on grounds of self-defense, but Snoop Dogg remained entangled in the legal battles around the case for three years.[100]

In July 1993, Snoop was stopped for a traffic violation and a firearm was found by police while conducting a search of his car. In February 1997, he pleaded guilty to possession of a handgun and was ordered to record three public service announcements, pay a $1,000 fine, and serve three years’ probation.[101][102]

In May 1998, Snoop Dogg was fined and arrested for a misdemeanor of marijuana possession.[103]

In October 2001, Snoop Dogg was arrested again for a misdemeanor of marijuana possession.[103] In 2002 he pleaded no contest and was fined a total of $398.30 and received a suspended 30-day jail sentence.[104]

Snoop Dogg, Tha Dogg Pound, and The Game were sued for assaulting a fan on stage at a May 2005 concert at the White River Amphitheatre in Auburn, Washington. The accuser, Richard Monroe, Jr., claimed he was beaten by the artists’ entourage while mounting the stage.[105] He alleged that he reacted to an “open invite” to come on stage. Before he could, Snoop’s bodyguards grabbed him and he was beaten unconscious by crewmembers, including the rapper and producer Soopafly; Snoop and The Game were included in the suit for not intervening. The lawsuit focuses on a pecuniary claim of $22 million in punitive and compensatory damagesbattery, negligence, and intentional infliction of emotional distress.[106] The concerned parties appeared in court in April 2009.

On April 26, 2006, Snoop Dogg and members of his entourage were arrested after being turned away from British Airways‘ first class lounge at Heathrow Airport. Snoop and his party were not allowed to enter the lounge because some of the entourage were flying first class, other members in economy class. After the group was escorted outside, they vandalized a duty-free shop by throwing whiskey bottles. Seven police officers were injured in the midst of the disturbance. After a night in jail, Snoop and the other men were released on bail on April 27, but he was unable to perform at the Premier Foods People’s Concert in Johannesburg on the same day. As part of his bail conditions, he had to return to the police station in May. The group has been banned by British Airways for “the foreseeable future.”[107][108] When Snoop Dogg appeared at a London police station on May 11, he was cautioned for affray under Section 4 of the Public Order Act for use of threatening words or behavior.[109] On May 15, the Home Office decided that Snoop Dogg should be denied entry to the United Kingdom for the foreseeable future due to the incident at Heathrow as well as his previous convictions in the United States for drugs and firearms offenses.[110][111] Snoop Dogg’s visa card was rejected by local authorities on March 24, 2007 because of the Heathrow incident.[112] A concert at London’s Wembley Arena on March 27 went ahead with Diddy (with whom he toured Europe) and the rest of the show. However the decision affected four more British performances in Cardiff, Manchester and Glasgow[113] and Budapest (due to rescheduling).[114] As of March 2010, Snoop Dogg has been allowed back into the UK.[1]

On September 27, 2006, Snoop Dogg was detained at John Wayne Airport in Orange County, California by airport security, after airport screeners found a collapsible police baton in Snoop’s carry-on bag. The baton was confiscated but Snoop was allowed to board the flight. He has been charged with various weapons violations stemming from this incident. Donald Etra, Snoop’s lawyer, told deputies the baton was a prop for a musical sketch. Snoop was sentenced to three years’ probation and 160 hours of community service starting on September 20, 2007.[115]

Snoop Dogg was arrested again on October 26, 2006 at Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, California while parked in a passenger loading zone. Approached by airport security for a traffic infraction, he was found in possession of marijuana and a firearm, according to a police statement. He was transported to Burbank Police Department Jail, booked, and released on $35,000 bond. He faced firearm and drug possession charges on December 12 at Burbank Superior Court.[116]

He was again arrested on November 29, 2006, after performing on The Tonight Show, for possession of marijuana and a firearm.[117]

Snoop was arrested again on March 12, 2007 in Stockholm, Sweden after performing in a concert with P. Diddy in Stockholm’s Globe Arena after he and a female companion reportedly “reeked” of marijuana. They were released four hours later after providing a urine sample. The results on urine determined whether charges would be pressed. However the rapper denied all charges.[118][119]

On April 26, 2007, the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship banned him from entering the country on character grounds, citing his prior criminal convictions. He had been scheduled to appear at the MTV Australia Video Music Awards on April 29, 2007.[120] Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship lifted the ban in September 2008 and had granted him visa to tour Australia. DIAC said “In making this decision, the department weighed his criminal convictions against his previous behaviour while in Australia, recent conduct – including charity work – and any likely risk to the Australian community … We took into account all relevant factors and, on balance, the department decided to grant the visa.”[121]

Snoop Dogg’s many legal issues forced San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom to withdraw his plan to issue a proclamation to the rapper.[122]

Snoop Dogg was banned from Parkpop, a festival in the Netherlands on June 27, 2010, where he was scheduled to perform. The mayor and law enforcement officials asked organizers of the festival to find an artist more “open and friendly” to play the event.[123]

Snoop Dogg was arrested again on January 7, 2012 for possession of Marijuana charge after Border control agents discovered a small amount of marijuana on his tour bus. Snoop Dogg was stopped at the same Sierra Blanca, Texas, checkpoint on Saturday where country singer Willie Nelson was arrested for marijuana possession in 2010. The agents conducted a routine inspection of his tour bus at the U.S.- Mexico border checkpoint, east of El Paso, Texas and thought they smelled marijuana. Snoop Dogg was issued a citation for possession of drug paraphernalia, released and given a court date of Friday, January 20, 2012.

 

 

Links:

http://www.drdre.com

https://twitter.com/#!/drdre

http://www.snoopdogg.com/

https://twitter.com/#!/snoopdogg

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Coachella 2012

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Coachella 2012 @ Empire Polo Fields – Indio, CA – 4/13/2012-4/15/2012

Posted on 16 February 2012 by admin

From Coachella.com

Although Festival Passes are sold out, sale the following items are still available:

– Shuttle Passes BUY NOW

– Lake Eldorado – Includes GA Passes BUY NOW

– Car Camping Passes BUY NOW

– Companion Camping Parking BUY NOW

– Safari Tents – Includes Passes BUY NOW

– Travel Packages BUY NOW

 

For all customer service needs related to festival passes, diagnosis please contact Front Gate:

PHONE: 888-512-SHOW

EMAIL: support@fgtcustomerservice.com

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: http://www.frontgatetickets.com/support/faq/#1

FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/frontgatetickets

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Goldie Loc – C’Mon Now Remix (prod. Roksonix)

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Goldie Loc – C’Mon Now Remix (prod. Roksonix)

Posted on 01 September 2011 by Bryan

 

The ever busy and diversified Snoop D oh double G (see Blast by Colt) has recently decided to step into the ever growing ground swell of the “undergound” dubstep scene with a new mix titled “Throw Ya Dubs Up: Dubstep LA Volume 2.”  Check out the first music video released from the mixtape, no rx Goldie Loc – C’Mon Now Remix (prod. Roksonix), discount which premiered on MediaContender.com today.

 

 

From MediaContender.com:

Snoop Dogg always seems to be one step ahead of his peers in staying relevant and catching on to new sounds and styles within the hip hop and rap game. Naturally, his ear turned to dubstep, and with that, come October he is presenting “Throw Ya Dubs Up: Dubstep LA Volume 2? with BBC Radio 1?sMistaJam. This mixtape is the second progression from Cashmere Agency‘s partnership with Mr Grustle & Tha Russian on Dubstep LA Volume 1. You can check it out here, mixed by Plastician it’s got an array of tunes from LA dubsteppers and various other champions of the dubstep scene.

Ok, here you go folks…gangsta dubstep is here! And once again, we’re giving it to you first. This is the premiere of the first music video from Throw Ya Dubs Up, from rapper Goldie Loc, who some of you may recognize from his collabs with Snoop as “The Eastsidaz”. It’s exactly what you’d expect, only they’re not only rapping over a grimey tearout dubstep track, they’re rapping ABOUT IT TOO! Check out the video to see for yourself, and keep your ears out for Throw Ya Dubs Up…Shit, I might just roll down Imperial Highway with the top down throwin up the W.

 

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Pacific Festival – Oak Canyon Ranch – Irvine, CA – 08/13/2011

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Pacific Festival – Oak Canyon Ranch – Irvine, CA – 08/13/2011

Posted on 17 August 2011 by Sam

Check out this Pacific Festival Mix from aRod | GottaDanceDirty™ while you read our review!

illness 0,40,0″> PACIFIC FESTIVAL 2011 PROMO MIX by aRod | GottaDanceDirty™

 

It was a sunny Saturday afternoon when a large number of the WAPA crew piled into cars and headed down to Orange County for the 2nd Annual Pacific Festival in Irvine, CA.  We were all excited to see what the festival would grow into this year because last year’s PF was held in the much smaller Triangle Square Shopping Center in Costa Mesa, home to popular nightclub Sutra.  The Oak Canyon Ranch has gained notoriety as a great venue filled with lush trees and scenery, thanks to it’s hosting of the annual Lightening in a Bottle Festival.  So, we were all excited to see what the fuss was all about.

 

We arrived around 4:00pm and walked over to the guest list/will call line to secure our tickets.  We’d all managed to obtain comp tickets which ended up being a double edged sword; while we didn’t have to pay, this meant we had to wait in a rather lengthy line of people all doing the same thing.

 

After some hassle and headache we all finally managed to make our way into the festival.  Our first stop was the Shagadelic Stage which was pretty much exactly what it sounds like.  It was a full size bus that had been converted into a stage covered in fake fur so that it looked somewhat like a dog.  We didn’t linger long at this stage because shortly after arriving they let loose a monstrous blast from an enormous fog horn attached to the side of the bus, nearly deafening us all.  Slightly annoyed and shocked by this, we headed over to the Main Stage to catch some of !!! (Chk, Chk, Chk).

 

Tyson, Hollie, & Myself

 

!!! put on a good set.  I’d never seen them before and I’m not terribly familiar with their catalogue of work, but I knew enough to know that they’d put on a high energy set of good indie dance rock.  They did just that and got the growing crowd dancing quickly.  I have to admit, I only half watched their set because the crowd of people in the VIP section was quickly growing to include more friends than I’ve probably ever seen in one place at a festival.  It was like all of the Los Angeles, Orange County, and San Diego scenes had converged in one place for an afternoon of fun in the sun.  It was great seeing so many friends, throwing back beers and chatting enthusiastically.  It was clear that the day’s sobriety was starting to go out the window, a fact welcomed by all.

 

CHECK OUT PHOTOS FROM PACIFIC FESTIVAL

 

Next we managed to drag ourselves away from the Main Stage for a bit to head over to the Pacific Stage for some of Phantogram’s set.  Again, I knew virtually nothing about this band except that fellow Party Animal Kylie Nelson had seen them the day before at Outside Lands and gave me a glowing review, so I decided they were worth checking out.  I’m glad I did, because their set was nothing short of awesome.  Band members Josh Carter and Sarah Barthel both possess phenomenal voices that created a very haunting, hypnotizing vibe.  If you have not heard this band yet I highly recommend you check them out.

 

 

After watching some of Phantogram’s set and chatting it up with my good friends from Gotta Dance Dirty at their merch table, fellow Party Animal Kate Green and I headed backstage to the artist area to fill up on some free beer.  Back there we ran into lots of good friends and did some more chit chatting and mingling.

 

Kate Green & Myself

 

Next it was time to head back to the Main Stage for Calvin Harris and Steve Aoki’s DJ sets.  I was particularly excited for these because my group PeaceTreaty is signed to Steve Aoki’s Dim Mak Records, and we’ve also shared stages with both Steve and Calvin several times before.  They’re both great guys and always deliver stellar performances.  Unfortunately, due to circumstances that were surely out of their control, both of their sets were plagued with sound system problems, but this didn’t stop them from getting the crowd riled up and crazy. Steve especially delivered his set with his usual gusto and high energy punch, spraying the crowd with champagne and causing general zaniness to ensue with his hit tracks “Warp 1.9”, “Pursuit of Happiness (Remix)”, and the amazing remix he did with the Bloody Beetroots of Refused’s classic “New Noise”.  Despite the sound problems, both DJ’s delivered excellent sets filled with their tracks that fans have come to love.

 

Steve Aoki

 

Finally  it was dark and one of the two acts we’d all be waiting for took the stage.  If you’ve never seen Texas-based Ghostland Observatory before than you’re really missing out.  These guys put on one of the most ridiculous live shows I’ve ever been fortunate enough to witness.  From the moment band members Aaron Kyle Behrens and Thomas Ross Turner took the stage, the whole Main Stage area was a raucous dance party.  Their crazy blend of electro, rock, and funk keeps people dancing until their feet fall off.  Top that off with the craziest laser light show I’ve ever seen a band carry on the road and you’ve got the makings for a killer set every time.  I’ll admit that I was too busy dancing to really pay much attention to the set list, so I’ll just let these pictures I took speak for themselves.

 

Lasers!

 

 

Noodling

 

With the crowd now in full rage mode, there was only one thing that could shift the party into stoner sway mode.  I’m talking of course about the Doggfather himself, Mr. Snoop D Oh Double G, Calvin Cordozar Broadus, a.k.a the one and only Snoop Dogg!!  Though he took the stage a half hour late in classic rapper fashion, no one seemed to care once the lights dimmed and the opening notes of his first track hit the speakers.  From the moment Snoop stepped on stage he had the audience eating out of the palm of his hand.  Clouds of marijuana smoke filled the air immediately and didn’t let up until he stepped off stage.

 

I have to say, it was quite surreal seeing Snoop perform live finally after following his music for so many years.  I really believe him to be one of the most iconic performers of all time, so finally seeing him in person just feet away from us was kind of a trip.  He really brought his A-Game to this performance too, carting with him a backing DJ, drummer, and percussionist, as well as various MC’s, dancers, etc.  He busted out all of his classic hits including “Gin & Juice”, “What’s My Name?”, “Next Episode”, “Drop It Like It’s Hot”, and my personal favorite “Regulators”, which featured an on-stage appearance by Warren G.  He also made sure to include a very touching moment of silence to honor his deceased comrade Nate Dogg.  Snoop’s set was packed front to back with amazing tracks including a new track which I didn’t catch the name of, but it was definitely a banger.  The whole WAPA crew thoroughly enjoyed his set and I can safely say that considering his canine nomenclature Snoop is definitely a Party Animal!!

 

 

By the end of Snoop’s set the WAPA crew was pretty tired and due to Snoop’s tardiness Cut Copy’s performance did not begin until it was supposed to end.  Knowing that we had long drives ahead of us and that traffic getting out of the festival would be gnarly, we decided to skip Cut Copy’s set and head home.  All in all the day was a good one filled with the usual WAPA antics and shenanigans.  Despite some logistical and sound problems and the most insanely long beer lines I’ve ever seen, we all still managed to have ourselves a good time thanks to the good vibes, great music, and good friends.  Hopefully next year Pacific Fest can work out these little bugs in their system because they really do have the makings of a great festival on their hands.

 

Porta WAPA

 

Here’s another Pacific Festival Mix from Them Jeans!

Pacific Festival 2011 Mixtape by Them Jeans by pacificfestival

 

 

 

Also, since none of the mixes included tracks from Ghostland Observatory (WTF?!?!) here is there latest dance floor rocking beat.  These guys kill it every time.

 

Ghostland Observatory – Kick Clap Speaker by wearepartyanimals

 

CHECK OUT PHOTOS FROM PACIFIC FESTIVAL

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Photos – Pacific Festival @ Oak Canyon Ranch – Silverado, CA – 08/13/2011

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Photos – Pacific Festival @ Oak Canyon Ranch – Silverado, CA – 08/13/2011

Posted on 16 August 2011 by George

 

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